Singer, Songwriter slash Mom
Congress House All Stars (Day 23)
26th Aug 2014 Posted in: Blog, shopkeeper Comments Off on Congress House All Stars (Day 23)

Welcome to Day 23 of the Indiegogo Campaign for The Shopkeeper: A Documentary about Mark Hallman and the Congress House. Every day during the campaign I am featuring a few artists who have recorded at the Congress House.

Micky & The Motorcars

Micky & the Motorcars is an Alternative Texas Country band formed in Stanley, Idaho before moving to Austin, Texas.

The band has released five mainstream albums, including a live album.

The band consists of Micky Braun (acoustic guitar, lead vocals), Gary Braun (lead & harmony vocals, guitars, mandolin, harmonica), Dustin Schaefer (lead guitar), Joe Fladger (bass), and Bobby Paugh (drums & percussion).

Micky and Gary Braun are the younger brothers of Willy and Cody Braun of the Austin-based band, Reckless Kelly. Micky and the Motorcars perform yearly at the Braun brothers Reunion, held in Challis, Idaho.

Ian Moore

Ian Moore (born August 8, 1968 in Berkeley, California, USA) is a guitarist and singer-songwriter from Austin, Texas. He studied fiddle as a child, but switched to guitar when wrist problems interfered. His music contains elements of folk, rock and roll, world music, and blues. After playing guitar in Joe Ely’s touring band and appearing on one studio album, he spent time in Austin with his own group, first Ian Moore and Moment’s Notice, then The Ian Moore Band. He attended The University of Texas at Austin but when given the opportunity for a nation wide tour, he dropped out with the intention of finishing later but, never did. Prior to Luminaria’s release, he moved to Vashon Island, located in Puget Sound near Seattle in the State of Washington, where portions of “To Be Loved” were recorded in his home studio.

Covers from “Green Grass”, which was his first non-Capricorn based album, include Jimmy Cliff’s “Many Rivers to Cross”, the Beatles’ “Hey Bulldog,” and Bob Dylan’s “You’re a Big Girl Now.” He has played with such musicians as the Rolling Stones, Bob Dylan, and ZZ Top, and appeared in Billy Bob Thornton’s movie Sling Blade.

Ian recently played guitar with Jason Mraz on his 2010 fall tour.

 

Bob Mould

Guitarist/singer/songwriter Bob Mould was initially a member of Hüsker Dü, one of the most influential American bands of the ’80s. Hüsker Dü was a post-hardcore punk band that helped define the sound and ideals of alternative rock. After Hüsker Dü broke up, Mould signed a solo contract with Virgin Records in 1988. The following year he released his first solo album, Workbook, which represented a major shift in sonic direction.

Frustrated with the business operations of major record labels, Mould left Virgin after the release of Black Sheets of Rain; they would later release a compilation of the two albums, Poison Years. Mould then formed an independent record company, SOL (Singles Only Label), which released 45s from new, developing bands as well as cult bands. In 1992, he formed a new trio, Sugar, with bassist David Barbe and drummer Malcolm Travis; the band signed with Rykodisc in the U.S. and Creation in the U.K. Sugar’s first album, Copper Blue, was released in the fall of 1992 to enthusiastic reviews and became Mould’s most successful project to date. Copper Blue nearly went gold and spawned several alternative radio and MTV hits, including “Helpless” and “If I Can’t Change Your Mind.” In the spring of 1993, Sugar released the mini-LP Beaster, a more abrasive collection than Copper Blue that was recorded at the same sessions. Around the time of the release of Beaster, Mould was forced out of the closet by various gay publications, with hopes that he would embrace their political cause; he rejected their requests.

Mould wrote the material for the second Sugar album during 1993. The band began recording in the spring of 1994, but the sessions ground to a halt and the tapes were erased. Mould decided to give the album one more try, and it was recorded quickly late that spring. The album, File Under: Easy Listening, appeared in the fall of 1994. Although it received good reviews and was moderately successful commercially, it didn’t match the performance of Copper Blue. In the spring of 1995, it was announced that Sugar was on hiatus. Besides, a collection of rarities and B-sides, was released that summer. By the fall, Mould had broken up the band and begun to work on a third album entirely by himself. Mould played all of the instruments on his self-titled third album, which was released in the spring of 1996. The Last Dog and Pony Show followed in 1998. In 2002, after a long period of musical inactivity, Mould returned with the electronics-heavy Modulate, followed by the more conventional Body of Song in 2005. After Blowoff, a dance project with Richard Morel, Mould returned to his guitar roots and paired up with Fugazi drummer Brendan Canty to record District Line in 2008.

Mould inched back to alt-rock on 2009’s Life and Times, then devoted himself to writing his autobiography with the assistance of Michael Azerrad. See a Little Light: The Trail of Rage and Melody was published in the summer of 2011. The following year, Mould returned to the sound of Sugar, playing the band’s 1992 debut in its entirety while on tour, reissuing the band’s catalog as deluxe editions, and, finally, reviving its sound on Silver Age, his first album for Merge Records. Silver Age was greeted by strong reviews, as was its 2014 successor, Beauty & Ruin, which also appeared on Merge.

Trish Murphy

For Austin’s Trish Murphy it’s been a stormy ride between records. But sometimes the pain makes you stronger and that is certainly the case with her splendid new release, Girls Get In Free. With a new found confidence, Murphy unleashes ten new songs filled with passion and charm as well as a tantalizing and rowdy duet with Austin heart throb Bob Schneider on Lyle Lovett’s “Cowboy Man.”

The Austin Chronicle has summed up the album and Trish’s talents best: “A striking tableau of empowerment, whimsicality, and longing set to rich, rootsy textures, Girls firmly secures Murphy’s place in the upper echelon of Austin singer-songwriters.” And it’s the songs on Girls Get In Free that are the real stars. From the first notes of the jangly set opener “All I Want” to the defiant “The Trouble With Trouble” to the impassioned country rocker “Crying As Fast As I Can” to the bittersweet atmospheric “I Don’t Want To Believe,” this is easily Trish’s best work to date.

Murphy has been a musician most of her life. A Houston native, her father, a struggling musician and songwriter, taught his three children to sing background harmonies for him when they were preschoolers. Although he eventually had to take jobs in construction to make a living, the family kept its bohemian values. While she was working her way through school, her dad encouraged her to get gigs to support herself, rather than pursue the proverbial something-to-fall-back-on. After receiving a BA in philosophy, she decided to fall back on music full-time. She formed a duo with her younger brother and Trish & Darin became one of the biggest-drawing acts in Houston for several years in the early 1990’s.

In 1996, she moved to Austin to nurture a solo career and became one of the fastest rising musical stars in Texas. Her discography now includes three solo albums, two of which she recorded and released on her own label. Crooked Mile was released independently in April 1997 to widespreadTrishimagestree.jpg (9129 bytes) critical raves. National distribution soon followed, along with constant touring throughout the U.S. and Europe. Tour highlights included a week with Lilith Fair and appearances on Mountain Stage and World Cafe. Her follow-up CD, Rubies on the Lawn (Doolittle/Mercury 1999), garnered national press, mainstream radio airplay and more international touring, including a return to the Lilith Fair in its final season. Captured, independently released in late 2001, found Trish returning to her Texas roots in a stripped-down, live acoustic setting, doing what she does best: telling stories and shooting from the hip.

Equally important to Murphy is her work as a volunteer board member of GenAustin, a non-profit outreach program that helps middle school-aged girls develop strong self-esteem. “In a way,” she explains, “it ties in with the concept of ‘girls get in free.’ They establish big sister, little sister programs to teach girls moral integrity at time in their lives when things change seemingly overnight.” Murphy’s dedication to the program is so deep seated that the CD release party for Girls Get In Free was a benefit for GenAustin.